Blog Archives

Friendships in Moose Jaw

 

“By now we had discovered that ten of the twenty-two pilots at Prestwick had failed the course; the twelve of us left from Prestwick stuck together, but three of us became particularly firm friends—myself, Jimmy Ward and a Geordie, Tommy Hunter. We used to call him the ‘Chinese Ambassador’ because we thought he looked a bit Chinese, but he assured us he was English.

“On the night of December 15th, the three of us met a small man in Moose Jaw in a large fur coat. He stopped us as we came out of a café and in a Yorkshire accent asked us if anyone came from the land of the White Rose. I told him I was born in Sheffield. That was good enough for him! He introduced himself as Mr Baxter, a Post Office worker, and said that he and his wife would be pleased to look after us during our stay in Moose Jaw. Before the evening was out we had been invited back to his cedar-wood bungalow and been introduced to his wife, his daughter Edna, her husband, Ed, and several other relations. There was a particularly pretty girl with whom Ward, at ease with any girl, had formed a firm friendship. On the other hand, I was a bit wary of the opposite sex, mainly because over the last few years I had not had much opportunity to socialise. And Wills was positively shy when confronted by some of the attractive girls who turned up at the Baxter’s home during our regular visits to the bungalow. These kind people entertained us royally for the rest of the tour. They escorted us to local shops and cafes and generally took us under their wing. No one could possibly meet nicer people than the Baxters and Co. Many a night we spent in their house, singing songs round the piano, and alwaysfinishing up with an excellent meal. And Mrs Baxter couldmake Yorkshire pudding!”

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12/02/2019 · 10:15 pm

Pre-War Prescott pictures

An Alvis doubles up as a useful washing line

An Alvis doubles up as a useful washing line

 

AlanJanetEliz

My cousins Alan and Janet. Their father Frank, was also in the RAF as ground crew electrician, as was our Uncle Alan, an aircraft engine fitter, both my father’s elder brothers.

My cousin Janet and partner John with a line of Singers

My cousin Janet and partner John with a line of Singers

Just to show you how wet it was on arrival - from the shelter of the tea tent

Just to show you how wet it was on arrival – from the shelter of the tea tent

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21/07/2014 · 8:21 pm

Ready to roll – ready to stop?!!!

Ready to roll - ready to stop?!!!

Ground Control has fixed the brakes – he hopes. And so do I. He has put Chattie through a test-run and now it’s my turn to take her down the steep hill in the morning en route to the Shobdon Food and Flying Festival. If you see me there in one piece, you’ll know it’s all worked.  For now, you can see I’m smiling!

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27/06/2014 · 10:36 pm

Grounded.

Grounded.

Ground Control living up to his job title.

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03/06/2014 · 9:49 pm

Chattie Chu Chu

Chattie Chu Chu

Let me introduce you to Chattie Chu Chu, my Singer Le Mans 9 special, which is a similar model to the one my father, Bryan Wild, bought towards the end of the second world war, when he was a night-fighter pilot with 25 Squadron, based at Castle Camps in Cambridgeshire.

This is the car in which I will be visiting all of the airfields he landed at during the war – nearly 60 of them, raising money for the RAF Benevolent Fund as I go, together with a couple of other charities.  This commemorative project will mark the 70th anniversary of the end of the war, and I am writing a book  which will use the airfields to tell the story of how the RAF developed into a force that was crucial in winning the war.

I am new to blogging, so forgive any blips as I get under way. A link to my fundraising page will appear shortly.

I do hope you will follow me.

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17/04/2014 · 9:27 pm